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Greenland

West Antarctic Ice Sheet Collapse: The Critical Path

By Abrupt changes, Climate Catastrophes, ice sheet, ice sheets, Impacts, Oceans, Sea Level Rise, West Antarctic Ice Sheet

    West Antarctic Ice Sheet Collapse: The Critical Path Article link Sea level rise estimates of around 10 feet by 2100 are now becoming hard to ignore. This article is about several new findings in 2018 that build on near-10 feet of sea level rise news from NOAA in 2016 and 2017. What is…

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Climate Change 2015: The Latest Science

By aerosols, Climate Policy, climate pollutants short-lived, CO2 Removal and Sequestration, Emissions, global cooling pollutants, Gulf Stream, ice sheet, in-depth and Popular Press, Negative emissions, short-term, Solutions, submarine channel, underice, West Antarctic Ice Sheet

First published on Truthout December 26, 3015, by Bruce Melton. Climate science is way out in front of climate policy. Commitments at the United Nations Climate Conference in Paris pale in comparison to those from the Kyoto Protocol with its beginnings in the Rio Earth Summit in 1992. The cheap and unambiguous solution of removing CO2…

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There All Along: “Exceptional” Slowdown of the Gulf Stream From Greenland Melt

By Abrupt changes, Arctic, Glaciers, Gulf Stream, Oceans, Truthout.org

First Published on Truthout, April 13, 2015. The Gulf Stream plays an immensely important role in moderating the climate of eastern North America and Europe. Moreover, Greenland melt impacts ocean current processes in the North Atlantic. For years, contradictory research has alternately said the Gulf Stream was slowing and that it was not slowing. The…

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IPCC Underestimates Greenland Ice Loss

By Glaciers, ice sheet

Greenland’s ice mass loss appears to be 22 percent more than 2013 IPCC suggests. The IPCC uses four major outlet glaciers to define Greenland ice mass loss. The most recent evaluation uses 130 glaciers and nearly 100,000 satellite laser altimetry points across Greenland. This work was published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of…

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Greenland: Jakobshavn New World Speed Record, Hundreds of Deeply Incised Underice Valleys Beneath Outlet Glaciers

By Glaciers, ice sheets, submarine channel, underice

The North Atlantic is warming and  Greenland’s ice loss has quadrupled in the last 20 years. Warm water is getting under the floating edges of outlet glaciers and causing thinning which in-turn causes the glaciers to speed up. New research has identified another and  possibly new dimension to the increase of outlet glacier flow that…

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Unprecedented in the Arctic: Warmer Now Than 44,000 to 120,000 Years Ago

By Arctic, Temperature, Uncategorized

A study in Geophysical Research Letters has found moss beneath a recently melted glacier on Baffin Island that dates back 44,000 to 120,000 years using radiocarbon-14 dating. This technique uses the radioactive decay rate of carbon-14, a rare but predictable version of a normal carbon atom, to date things that were once alive. The radioactive…

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Ice Sheets Behaving Badly

By Sea Level Rise, Uncategorized

The most recent discoveries in climate science bear little resemblance to what we hear in the media. Greenland’s melt in 2012 for example has been widely advertised in the media as just another weather event, similar to many in the past. The adage that we cannot tell for sure if any single weather event was…

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Greenland Melt: Much Faster Than Previously Thought

By Uncategorized

What was previously thought to be the threshold or complete melting of the Greenland Ice Sheet was an average global warming of 3.4 to 9.2 degrees F has now been refined to 1.4 to 5.8 degrees F. this is roughly half the warming that we previously understood. What was previously thought to be the threshold…

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Greenland Melt Equals 2010, Melt Index was 6th Greatest in 2010

By Uncategorized

Our buddy Tedesco at Cryospheric Processes tells us that The Greenland Melt Index ranked 6th in 2011. The melt index anomaly is the number of days with detectable surface melt compared to the baseline period of 1979-2010, and is estimated from satellite microwave observations. But this “melt index” is something like comparing sea ice extents…

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